Dealing With Problems and Opportunities

People are mostly predictable. If they have a problem or opportunity they know about, they are usually not long finding a way to deal with it.

What does dealing with a problem or opportunity mean?

There are steps.

  1. Is it a problem or opportunity I care about?
  2. Do I have or can I get the resources I need to deal with it?
  3. Are there known methods to connect the resources to the problem or opportunity?
  4. Can I access those methods?
  5. Could I employ them if I had them?
  6. Will the solution happen in a time frame I can accept?
  7. Are there unpleasant side effects?

Advisors deal with topics 3 through 7 and sometimes help with 2.

In the ’80s, MDRT had a list of values that clients appreciate. Number one among them:

“Identification of a problem or opportunity that I did not know I had or a creative solution to a problem I did know about.”

Find the problem. Find the sale.

People want life to be simple. Too often that involves ignoring potential problems. Even when people look, they usually do not get a clear picture of dimensions or possible solutions. Advisors assign meaning to the problem and provide solutions that make it go away.

No one solves a problem before they know they have one.

Successful advisors find, illustrate, describe, and explain both the problem and the solution. Only then do they arrange the solution. 

Most things are easier to sell if the customer understands the purpose and wants to own the solution.

Don Shaughnessy arranges life insurance for people who understand the value of a life insured estate. He can be reached at The Protectors Group, a large insurance, employee benefits, and investment agency in Peterborough, Ontario.  In previous careers, he has been a partner in a large international public accounting firm, CEO of a software start-up, a partner in an energy management system importer, and briefly in the restaurant business.

Please be in touch if I can help you.  don@moneyfyi.com  866-285-7772

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